Cutting Off Heads A review of Foucault with Marx by Jacques Bidet (2016)

Jacques Bidet’s Foucault with Marx reviewed by Jason Read.

Foucault News

Jason Read, Cutting Off Heads. A review of Foucault with Marx by Jacques Bidet (Zed Books: London, 2016)

Jacques Bidet’s Foucault with Marx represents yet another contribution to the eventual overcoming of an academic skirmish between advocates of Foucault and Marx, itself a smaller conflict in the larger battle of postmodernism versus Marxism. The perspective which saw Marx and Foucault as mutually opposed theoretical camps has begun to fade thanks to both the publication of Foucault’s courses and lectures, most importantly the short essay on “The Mesh of Power,” and the publication of several texts, such as the monumental collection Marx & Foucault: Lectures, usages, confrontations in France. However, the dissipation of Team Foucault and Team Marx is only a first step; it remains to be seen how Foucault and Marx are related and how their different examinations into history, modernity, and society can be brought together through…

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Papers in Progress

Our opening comments were in part based on articles we wrote separately, that are both appearing in Progress in Human Geography. They are available in the ‘Online First’ section of the website –

http://phg.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0309132509358474v1

and

http://phg.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0309132510362603v1

Please contact either of us if you can’t access the papers through your own libraries…

VGI in Haiti

Muki Haklay has an interesting post about the state of play regarding VGI (volunteered geographic information) in Haiti and possible conflicts between OpenStreetMap and Google.

Here is a comparison map of coverage, where “yellow means that there is a better coverage in Map Maker, and blue means that there is a better coverage in OpenStreetMap. The difference between the two datasets is expressed in metres.”

Muki says:

there are differences between the two sources of data, and these may matter as the relief work is carried out. The evaluation question is:  for each grid square, which of the datasets contains more information in terms of roads length?

Final line up, AAG 2010 Territory and Cartography III

Title: Territory and Cartography: Politics, History, Techniques III
Description: The relation between cartography and territory seems well-known. State territories are one of the key objects of cartographic work, both in terms of their depiction on geopolitical maps and in terms of the state agencies that produce maps of their territory. Here we want to reverse the question: to what extent is cartography productive of territory? If territory can be understood as a political technology, comprising a range of techniques for the measurement of land and the control of terrain, then cartography, alongside land surveying and the military, is one of those techniques; part of what might be conceived of as state territorial strategies.

These three sessions aim to bring together papers analysing maps politically in terms of their relation to the state and its territory, drawing on a range of historical and geographical contexts. The principle question is: if we know that the map is not the territory, to what extent is it still productive of it?

This third session includes papers that consider the politics of territory and cartography.

Anticipated Attendance: 50
Organizers:
Jeremy Crampton
Stuart Elden
Chairs:
Stuart Elden
Participants:
Presenter: Martin Pratt, Unreliable Witnesses? Maps as Evidence in Boundary and Sovereignty Disputes
Presenter: Helga Tawil-Souri, Virtually Mapping Palestinian Dis-/Re-Appearances
Presenter: Mona Domosh, Corporate cartographies and the making of an American empire
Presenter: Elena Dell’Agnese, “Manifest Cartography”: US territorial expansion, textbooks and the logo-mapping of the Western hemisphere

Final line up, AAG 2010 Territory and Cartography II

Title: Territory and Cartography: Politics, History, Techniques II
Description: Territory and Cartography: Politics, History, Techniques

The relation between cartography and territory seems well-known. State territories are one of the key objects of cartographic work, both in terms of their depiction on geopolitical maps and in terms of the state agencies that produce maps of their territory. Here we want to reverse the question: to what extent is cartography productive of territory? If territory can be understood as a political technology, comprising a range of techniques for the measurement of land and the control of terrain, then cartography, alongside land surveying and the military, is one of those techniques; part of what might be conceived of as state territorial strategies.

These three sessions aim to bring together papers analysing maps politically in terms of their relation to the state and its territory, drawing on a range of historical and geographical contexts. The principle question is: if we know that the map is not the territory, to what extent is it still productive of it?

This second session deals with historical issues of territory.

Anticipated Attendance: 50
Organizers:
Jeremy Crampton
Stuart Elden
Chairs:
Jeremy Crampton
Participants:
Presenter: Scott Kirsch, The Invention of Territory
Presenter: John Hessler, Economic Foundations of Roman Cartography: Law, Territory, and Epigraphy, 100 BC-300 AD
Presenter: Michael Heffernan, Maps and the City: Paris and the 18th Century Cartographic Imagination
Presenter: Catherine Dunlop, Borderland Cartography from Below: The Role of Civil Society in Mapping Alsace-Lorraine, 1860-1918
Presenter: Nessa Cronin, The Jurisdiction of the Map: Official and unofficial productions of imperial space in the Ordnance Survey of Ireland, 1824-46
Sponsorships: Cartography Specialty Group
Historical Geography Specialty Group
Political Geography Specialty Group